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London Bridge Recalls Sock and Wrist Rattle Sets Due to Choking Hazard

This recall involves a set of matching baby socks and wristband which contain a small rattle sewn inside the wristband and the toe of each sock. The sets were sold in various colors and styles, including strawberry, ladybug, animals and sports themes. The product is

By |2019-08-07T16:27:05+00:00August 7th, 2019|Child Safety, Product Recalls|Comments Off on London Bridge Recalls Sock and Wrist Rattle Sets Due to Choking Hazard

Woman Struck By Falling Metal In Boston’s North End

A woman in her 30s sustained critical injuries when she was apparently struck by a falling metal railing while walking on a sidewalk on Atlantic Avenue around 8:30 Thursday morning. Witnesses say she was walking with her husband and her dog when it happened. “People

By |2019-07-26T16:23:14+00:00July 26th, 2019|Construction Site Accidents, In The News|Comments Off on Woman Struck By Falling Metal In Boston’s North End

The Boppy Company Recalls Infant Head and Neck Support Accessories Due to Suffocation Hazard

This recall involves Boppy Head and Neck support sold in two styles: Ebony Floral and Heathered Gray with model numbers 4150114 and 4150117. The model number is printed on the fabric label on the back of the head support. The product is an accessory to

By |2019-07-25T19:41:13+00:00July 25th, 2019|Child Safety, Product Recalls|Comments Off on The Boppy Company Recalls Infant Head and Neck Support Accessories Due to Suffocation Hazard

Home elevators have killed and injured kids for decades. Safety regulators won’t order a simple fix.

It was lunchtime when 2 1 /2-year-old Fletcher Hartz opened the door to the elevator at his grandparents’ home in Little Rock. His mother, Nicole Hartz, stood a few feet away in the kitchen making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. She didn’t see him walk into the

By |2019-07-23T23:04:21+00:00July 23rd, 2019|Accidental Death|Comments Off on Home elevators have killed and injured kids for decades. Safety regulators won’t order a simple fix.

Jury awards $11.5 million to Framingham girl in medical malpractice suit

A jury has awarded $11.5 million to a Framingham girl whose family filed a medical malpractice suit against a radiologist at Newton-Wellesley Hospital, finding that he was negligent in his care of her by not properly reacting to a heart problem she had 10 years

By |2019-07-23T22:56:49+00:00July 23rd, 2019|Medical Malpractice|Comments Off on Jury awards $11.5 million to Framingham girl in medical malpractice suit

Jury awards $11.5 million to Framingham girl in medical malpractice suit

A jury has awarded $11.5 million to a Framingham girl whose family filed a medical malpractice suit against a radiologist at Newton-Wellesley Hospital, finding that he was negligent in his care of her by not properly reacting to a heart problem she had 10 years

By |2019-06-18T07:18:05+00:00June 18th, 2019|Medical Malpractice|Comments Off on Jury awards $11.5 million to Framingham girl in medical malpractice suit

Boom in electric scooters leads to more injuries, fatalities

Boom in electric scooters leads to more injuries, fatalities   Andrew Hardy was crossing the street on an electric scooter in downtown Los Angeles when a car struck him at 50 miles per hour and flung him 15 feet in the air before he smacked

By |2019-06-13T16:15:21+00:00June 13th, 2019|Accidental Death, Car Accidents, Catastrophic Injuries, In The News|Comments Off on Boom in electric scooters leads to more injuries, fatalities

Fisher-Price invented a popular baby sleeper without medical safety tests and kept selling it, even as babies died

Fisher-Price thought it had a hit on its hands.   It was 2009, and a small team of engineers at the toy company outside Buffalo seemed to have solved one of the most vexing problems for new parents: getting babies to sleep. Their invention was

By |2019-06-03T07:21:36+00:00June 3rd, 2019|In The News, Product Recall|Comments Off on Fisher-Price invented a popular baby sleeper without medical safety tests and kept selling it, even as babies died